International Edu News: Frailty, old age and comorbidity main predictors of death from Covid-19  |  Policy Indications: Cyber centre to reduce digital harm  |  Policy Indications: New funding to improve water security for 10 million people in Africa and Asia  |  International Edu News: UCL hosts global conference on UN Sustainable Development Goals  |  International Edu News: Medium-term impact of COVID-19 revealed in new study  |  International Edu News: Extremely rapid diagnostic test for Covid-19  |  Teacher Insights: Cambridge University Press to join with Cambridge Assessment  |  National Edu News: Minister inaugurates new Diamond Jubilee Lecture Hall Complex of NIT Jamshedpur  |  Education Information: CSIR partnered clinical trials website “CUReD” on Repurposed Drugs for Covid- 19  |  Teacher Insights: The 6th India International Science Festival to be held in Virtual format  |  National Edu News: Minister virtually inaugurates golden jubilee building at NIT Tiruchirappalli  |  Policy Indications: 'NEP 2020 gives importance to Learning through Experience & Living'  |  Education Information: Union Education Minister inaugurates Golden Jubilee Building at NIT Rourkela  |  National Edu News: Union Education Minister virtually attends 8th Convocation of IIT Indore  |  National Edu News: PM addresses the Centenary Convocation of the University of Mysore   |  
April 22, 2019 Monday 10:09:48 PM IST

Short Rest Intervals Help May Improve Memory and Learning

Teacher Insights

Short rest in between learning sessions can help strengthen memory and improve learning skills, according to a new research report.

The participants in the study who were right handed were told to type a series of numbers on a screen as many times as possible for 10 seconds using left hand. They were allowed a 10 second break again followed by 10 second typing and break for 36 times. The brain waves of the participants were observed and it was found that it changed more during rest than in typing sessions. Their performance improved during the short rest intervals which added to the overall gains made during the day. The rest period was utilised by their brains to consolidate or solidify the memories.


The findings are applicable for rehabilitation of stroke patients and learning piano for healthy people, according to researchers. It is not yet proven that the results can be applied for all forms of learning and memory retention.

Source: https://www.cell.com/current-biology/fulltext/S0960-9822(19)30219-2



Comments