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April 22, 2019 Monday 10:09:48 PM IST

Short Rest Intervals Help May Improve Memory and Learning

Teacher Insights

Short rest in between learning sessions can help strengthen memory and improve learning skills, according to a new research report.

The participants in the study who were right handed were told to type a series of numbers on a screen as many times as possible for 10 seconds using left hand. They were allowed a 10 second break again followed by 10 second typing and break for 36 times. The brain waves of the participants were observed and it was found that it changed more during rest than in typing sessions. Their performance improved during the short rest intervals which added to the overall gains made during the day. The rest period was utilised by their brains to consolidate or solidify the memories.


The findings are applicable for rehabilitation of stroke patients and learning piano for healthy people, according to researchers. It is not yet proven that the results can be applied for all forms of learning and memory retention.

Source: https://www.cell.com/current-biology/fulltext/S0960-9822(19)30219-2



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