Technology Inceptions: Powerful Robots Helps in Faster Detection of Bridge Defects  |  Teacher Insights: Are you susceptible to persuasion?   |  Science Innovations: Mushrooms to help fight TB  |  Management lessons: How to Create Cool Brands and Stay Cool  |  Health Monitor: Honey Helps Increase Testosterone Levels in Males  |  Parent Interventions: Women Oncologists Skip Scientific Conference to Take Care of Children  |  Career News: Chinmaya University-CPPR Announce MA in Public Policy and Governance Course  |  Parent Interventions: Electrical zap to retrieve memory  |  Science Innovations: Laura Kreidberg: Trying to Spot the First Sign of Life Outside Earth  |  Parent Interventions: Don't Let Children Drink Too Much Juice, Sugar Water With Little Nutrients  |  Technology Inceptions: Low-Cost Tissue Freezing Device to Help In Breast Cancer Treatment  |  Science Innovations: Exomoons May Become Quasi-planets  |  Science Innovations: Blue Tongue Lizard Babies As Clever as Adults  |  Parent Interventions: Quality Sleep for Teen Health   |  Technology Inceptions: MIT Develops Artificial 'Muscles' Based on Fibers  |  
  • Pallikkutam Magazine
  • Companion Magazine
  • Mentor
  • Smart Board
  • Pallikkutam Publications

January 24, 2018 Wednesday 04:56:38 PM IST

Sharing the 'fun' and the 'work of parenting

Parent Interventions

Why does it seem that mothers are more stressed about their children while fathers maintain a cooler and more laid back attitude? Maybe it has to do with the different tasks each parent performs with the child. A team of researchers from Cornell University, the University of Minnesota, and Minnesota Population Center who delved into this found that mothers are less happy than fathers with parenting duties and report more stress and greater fatigue than fathers. The paper was recently published in the American Sociological Review.

'The good news from our study is that parents generally enjoy being with their kids,' said researcher Ann Meier, 'but the bad news is that mothers enjoy it less than fathers because they do more of the 'work' and less of the 'fun' parenting tasks.'

Meier and her colleagues Kelly Musick and Sarah Flood used time diary data from more than 12,000 parents and examined the types of parenting activities mothers and fathers performed and individual well-being during the activities.

The researchers found that it is not only parenting activities that differ, but the environment surrounding the activity differs as well. Meier explained, 'When mothers are with their kids, they are more often by themselves. When fathers are with their kids, they are more likely to have other adults around, offering some back-up. This helps us understand why fathers are less stressed when with kids.'


Sleep also had an effect on parents' differing levels of happiness, said Meier. 'Mothers are more likely than fathers to be called on by kids 'around the clock'. Fathers' sleep and down time are less likely to be interrupted by kids. This is part of the reason fathers are less tired than mothers when parenting.'

The new paper confirms what many mothers have noted anecdotally. The data around parenting, activities, and happiness may help close the experience gap between genders. Meier says, 'Having data systematically collected from thousands of parents allows us to confirm what parents have known for years--that parenting is meaningful but also stressful and tiring. Many mothers will recognise their experiences of interrupted sleep and daily feeding and bathing. Hopefully, many dads will see that their partners will likely be happier if they trade some of their leisure time with kids for more of the 'work' of parenting.'

Comments