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October 07, 2017 Saturday 09:46:23 AM IST

Sharenting Shall not Violate Child’s Privacy

Parent Interventions

Parents hooked to Facebook have been warned against creating a digital footprint for their kids so early in life.

 

The UK-based children’s charity, the National Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NSPCC), has urged parents to think twice before posting pictures of their children on social media. Of grave concern is the fact that children, once they are grown up, tend to resent such apparently “innocent” acts of joy displayed by parents who post what they perceive as “awkward” pictures of their childhood. The charity has cautioned adults against posting pictures and videos of their wards online without their permission. If parents are unsure whether their kids will appreciate the act or not, it’s better not to post them at all, warns NSPCC.

 


A charity spokesperson said parents ought to pause and think whether such photo parenting or “sharenting” as it’s been coined, would embarrass their kids or not

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