Policy Indications: Harvard Teacher Fellows provides new teachers, local impact  |  International Edu News: Oxford's COVID-19 vaccine offers a high level of protection  |  Leadership Instincts: Harvard University CFAR announces leadership change  |  Parent Interventions: Virtual holiday toy and joy drive  |  Leadership Instincts: New Zealand PM to receive 2020 Gleitsman International Activist Award  |  International Edu News: Science and Innovation Fellowship accepting applications  |  Policy Indications: National Coalition calls for new White House-led focus on children and youth  |  Education Information: Faculty alter new first-year requirement because of continuing Covid-19  |  Leadership Instincts: Phiala Shanahan receives Kenneth G. Wilson Award  |  Leadership Instincts: Erik Demaine wins 2020 MIT Bose Award for Excellence in Teaching  |  Education Information: Second annual MIT Science Bowl Invitational takes virtual format  |  International Edu News: Meghan Davis named 2022 Mitchell Scholar  |  National Edu News: Multilateral cooperation is the key to overcoming global challenges: Minister  |  National Edu News: Tenth edition of National Science Film Festival kicks offin a virtual mode  |  Technology Inceptions: ‘WalkON Suit 4’ Releases Paraplegics from Wheelchairs​  |  
October 07, 2017 Saturday 09:46:23 AM IST

Sharenting Shall not Violate Child’s Privacy

Parent Interventions

Parents hooked to Facebook have been warned against creating a digital footprint for their kids so early in life.

 

The UK-based children’s charity, the National Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NSPCC), has urged parents to think twice before posting pictures of their children on social media. Of grave concern is the fact that children, once they are grown up, tend to resent such apparently “innocent” acts of joy displayed by parents who post what they perceive as “awkward” pictures of their childhood. The charity has cautioned adults against posting pictures and videos of their wards online without their permission. If parents are unsure whether their kids will appreciate the act or not, it’s better not to post them at all, warns NSPCC.

 


A charity spokesperson said parents ought to pause and think whether such photo parenting or “sharenting” as it’s been coined, would embarrass their kids or not

Comments