Cover Story: WHEN FOOD COMES CALLING  |  Cover Story: Yours Online, Kudumbashree  |  Cover Story: DATE WITH THE DIGITAL  |  Rajagiri Round Table: IT'S E-S FOR SHOPPING  |  Technology Inceptions: Astrophysicists Count All the Starlight in the Universe  |  Leadership Instincts: China’s female beauty paradigms changes themselves   |  Parent Interventions: Sleepless babies! Inactivity may be the culprit  |  Parent Interventions: How to teach kids to deal with money   |  Scholarships & Sponsorships: POST GRADUATE SCHOLARSHIP FOR SINGLE GIRL CHILD 2018-19  |  Technology Inceptions: Indian Robotics Company Emotix Launches Miko 2, a Companion for Children  |  Technology Inceptions: Samsung 860 QVO Affordable Multi-Terabyte Storage SSD Launched  |  Parent Interventions: Do not coerce your child for reluctant apology  |  Science Innovations: MIT engineers develop first-ever plane propelled by “ionic wind”  |  Parent Interventions: “Parentese” is good for infant’s language development  |  Technology Inceptions: First Gene-Edited Human Babies Claimed in China  |  
  • Pallikkutam Magazine
  • Companion Magazine
  • Mentor
  • Smart Board

September 17, 2018 Monday 12:59:39 PM IST
Sexual violence leaves indelible marks on women’s psyche

Women who are sexually assaulted experience had more intense memories -- even decades after the violence occurred -- that are difficult, if not impossible to forget. They cherished more vivid memories than women coping with the aftermath of other traumatic, life-altering events not associated with sexual violence, according to a recent Rutgers-New Brunswick study, published in Frontiers in Psychiatry.

"To some extent it is not surprising that these memories relate to more feelings of depression and anxiety because these women remember what happened and think about it a lot," said Tracey Shors, co-author of the study.

The women with a history of sexual violence reported stronger memories with specific details that included seeing the event clearly in their mind. They reported having a harder time forgetting the incident and believed it to be a significant part of their life story, according to the research.

"This problem will not go away soon and we must keep our attention focused on prevention and justice for survivors -- and their recovery," Shors said.

DOI: 10.3389/fpsyt.2018.00311

Comments