Leadership Instincts: IIT Hyderabad -ICAT MoU for Collaboration in Autonomous Navigation  |  Education Information: IIT Hyderabad Retains Top 10 Rank in QS Rankings in India  |  Cover Story: Elimination Round or Aptitude Test- How to Align CUET with NEP 2020 Goals  |  Life Inspirations: Master of a Dog House  |  Education Information: Climate Predictions: Is it all a Piffle!  |  Leadership Instincts: Raj Mashruwala Establishes CfHE Vagbhata Chair in Medical Devices at IITH   |  Parent Interventions: 10 Tricks to Help You Prepare for This Year's IB Chemistry Test  |  National Edu News: TiHAN supports a Chair for Prof Srikanth Saripalli at IIT Hyderabad  |  Teacher Insights: How To Build Competitive Mindset in Children Without Stressing Them  |  Parent Interventions: What Books Children Must Read this Summer Vacation   |  Policy Indications: CUET Mandatory for Central Universities  |  Teacher Insights: Classroom Dialogue for a Better World  |  Rajagiri Round Table: Is Time Ripe for Entrepreneurial Universities in India?  |  Life Inspirations: How to Overcome Fear of Public Speaking  |  Parent Interventions: Wide Ranging Problems of Preterm Infants  |  
December 17, 2021 Friday 12:25:16 PM IST

Semiconductors that Stretch like Human Skin

From rigid substrates, semi conductors are moving towards new, flexible substrates which have led to the fabrication of numerous devices. The Georgia tech researchers have created a material that acts like a second skin layer and is up to 200% more stretchable than its original dimension without significantly losing its electric current. The researchers say the soft flexible photo detectors could enhance the utility of medical wearable sensors and implantable devices, among other applications.

The new semiconductor has properties similar to that of a rubber band. When conventional semi conductors break under strain, this new semiconductor is soft and stretchable and still has all the properties of a solid and rigid semiconductor. It is a super-soft material with the ability to generate and conduct electricity when exposed to light and he materials’ stretchability, especially given that a single layer was 1,000 times thinner than a human hair.

Comments