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October 04, 2019 Friday 07:14:09 AM IST

Seizure control with ketogenic diet

Parent Interventions

Infants and young children with epilepsy due to a confirmed genetic abnormality have a better response to treatment with ketogenic diet, compared to patients with other types of epilepsy, according to a review of 10-year experience at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago.

Ketogenic diet continues to be a safe, effective and well-tolerated treatment for patients under 3 years of age with drug-resistant epilepsy. 
Ketogenic diet is a high fat, low carbohydrate and protein restricted diet that is rigorously medically supervised. It is widely recognized as an effective treatment for epilepsy that does not respond to medications.

The ketogenic diet is challenging to maintain and parents need extensive multi-disciplinary support, especially during the complicated period of solid food introduction. Genetic testing for infants and children with suspected genetic causes of epilepsy should be performed as early as possible so that we can provide the most precise treatments right away.


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