Life Inspirations: Ladies and Gentlemen!  |  Technology Inceptions: New Device Detects Decline in RBC Volume Causing Blurred Vision in Alcoholics  |  National Edu News: GATI, CURIE, WISTEMM, Vigyan Jyoti for attracting Women to Science & Tech  |  Rajagiri Round Table: Roadmap to Excellence in Research and Innovation  |  Policy Indications: Should Climate Change Communications be Emotional?  |  Science Innovations: Scientists Understand the Logistics of Protein Movement in a Cell  |  Health Monitor: Eating Disorders Linked to Psychiatric Disorders and Risk of Obesity  |  Science Innovations: The Mystery of the Flying Volcanic Ash Particles Revealed  |  Policy Indications: UK Graduate route to open to international students on 1 July 2021  |  Leadership Instincts: VP appeals to students to connect their knowledge with social relevance  |  Leadership Instincts: Catherine Dulac receives Nomis Distinguished Scientist and Scholar Award  |  Leadership Instincts: Online school reviews reflect school demographics more than effectiveness  |  Leadership Instincts: Researchers virtually open and read sealed historic letters  |  Cover Story: At Vantage Point  |  Management lessons: Why Aluminium Cans are Great for Packaging of Beverages?  |  
March 16, 2018 Friday 02:07:09 PM IST

Scientists discover evidence of early human innovation

Science Innovations

Anthropologists at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History and an international team of collaborators have discovered that early humans in East Africa had begun trading with distant groups, using color pigments and manufacturing more sophisticated tools than those of the Early Stone Age. The new discovery date t the oldest known fossil record of Homo Sapiens.



These behaviors, which are characteristic of humans who lived during the Middle Stone Age, replaced technologies and ways of life that had been in place for hundreds of thousands of years.


The new discoveries, reported in three studies published March 15 in the journal Science, indicate that these behaviors emerged during a period of tremendous environmental variability in the region. As earthquakes remodeled the landscape and climate fluctuated between wet and dry conditions, technological innovation, social exchange networks and early symbolic communication would have helped early humans survive and obtain the resources they needed despite unpredictable conditions, the scientists say.


The first evidence of human life in the Olorgesailie Basin comes from about 1.2 million years ago. For hundreds of the thousands of years, people living there made and used large stone-cutting tools called handaxes. Beginning in 2002, Potts, Brooks and their team discovered a variety of smaller, more carefully shaped tools in the Olorgesailie Basin. Isotopic dating by Deino and collaborators revealed that the tools were surprisingly old--made between 320,000 and 305,000 years ago. These tools were carefully crafted and more specialized than the large, all-purpose handaxes. Many were points designed to be attached to a shaft and potentially used as projectile weapons, while others were shaped as scrapers or awls.

While the handaxes of the earlier era were manufactured using local stones, the Smithsonian team found small stone points made of non-local obsidian at their Middle Stone Age sites. The team also found larger, unshaped pieces of the sharp-edged volcanic stone at Olorgesailie, which has no obsidian source of its own. The diverse chemical composition of the artifacts matches that of a wide range of obsidian sources in multiple directions 15 to 55 miles away, suggesting exchange networks were in place to move the valuable stone across the ancient landscape.


The team also discovered black and red rocks--manganese and ocher--at the sites, along with evidence that the rocks had been processed for use as coloring material

Hoping to understand what might have driven such fundamental changes in human behavior, the research team integrated data from a variety of sources to assess and reconstruct the ancient environment in which the users of these artifacts lived. Their findings suggest that the period when these behaviors emerged was one of changing landscapes and climate, in which the availability of resources would have been unreliable.

(Source: EurekaAlerts)


Comments