Technology Inceptions: Powerful Robots Helps in Faster Detection of Bridge Defects  |  Teacher Insights: Are you susceptible to persuasion?   |  Science Innovations: Mushrooms to help fight TB  |  Management lessons: How to Create Cool Brands and Stay Cool  |  Health Monitor: Honey Helps Increase Testosterone Levels in Males  |  Parent Interventions: Women Oncologists Skip Scientific Conference to Take Care of Children  |  Career News: Chinmaya University-CPPR Announce MA in Public Policy and Governance Course  |  Parent Interventions: Electrical zap to retrieve memory  |  Science Innovations: Laura Kreidberg: Trying to Spot the First Sign of Life Outside Earth  |  Parent Interventions: Don't Let Children Drink Too Much Juice, Sugar Water With Little Nutrients  |  Technology Inceptions: Low-Cost Tissue Freezing Device to Help In Breast Cancer Treatment  |  Science Innovations: Exomoons May Become Quasi-planets  |  Science Innovations: Blue Tongue Lizard Babies As Clever as Adults  |  Parent Interventions: Quality Sleep for Teen Health   |  Technology Inceptions: MIT Develops Artificial 'Muscles' Based on Fibers  |  
  • Pallikkutam Magazine
  • Companion Magazine
  • Mentor
  • Smart Board
  • Pallikkutam Publications

September 22, 2018 Saturday 11:40:11 AM IST

Scientists Develop Nano-Filter That Cleans Water 100 Times Faster

Technology Inceptions

Australian scientists said on Friday, 21 September that they have developed a Nano -filter that can clean contaminated water 100 times faster than the current technology, pointing to better access to the crucial resource worldwide.

The filter removes oils and heavy metals including lead from water via an alloy that combines gallium-based liquid metals with aluminium, helping to absorb the contaminants with aluminium oxide compounds, RMIT University said in a statement about the innovation that also involved researchers from the University of New South Wales, reports Xinhua news

Water contamination remains a significant challenge globally, with one in nine people without access to clean water close to home, and heavy metal contamination "causes serious health problems and children are particularly vulnerable", RMIT researcher Ali Zavabeti said.

"Our new Nano -filter is sustainable, environmentally-friendly, scalable and low cost," said Zavabeti, whose team's findings were published in the journal Advanced Functional Materials.


"Previous research has already shown the materials we used are effective in absorbing contaminants like mercury, sulphates and phosphates.

"With further development and commercial support, this new Nano-filter could be a cheap and ultra-fast solution to the problem of dirty water.

Comments