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June 22, 2018 Friday 02:18:28 PM IST

School Toilet Facilities - Basic Requirements

Education Information

In order to comply with school premises regulations, each school must meet basic standards. Having proper Toilet facilities is one of the basic facilities that a school should have.

Here are the basic requirements of a toilet in school.

1. Separate Toilets for Boys and Girls

Separate toilet facilities must be in place for boys and girls aged 8 or over. Exceptions are made for disabled facilities and for unisex toilets that can be secured from the inside and are meant to be used by one person at a time.


2. Drinking Water

Drinking water must be supplied in a separate area from the toilets. There must not be a drinking water supply within the school toilets. Children must be able to access drinking water whenever needed and it should be clearly marked as drinking water. 

3. Non-Drinking Water 

There should be an adequate supply of hot and cold water to sinks, basins and shower facilities and toilets and urinals should have an adequate supply of cold water.


4. Water Temperature

So as not to pose a scalding risk, it’s best practice to ensure that the temperature of hot water in primary schools and nursery schools does not exceed 43 degrees centigrade. 

(Indebted to various sources)



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