Cover Story: WHEN FOOD COMES CALLING  |  Cover Story: Yours Online, Kudumbashree  |  Cover Story: DATE WITH THE DIGITAL  |  Rajagiri Round Table: IT'S E-S FOR SHOPPING  |  Technology Inceptions: Astrophysicists Count All the Starlight in the Universe  |  Leadership Instincts: China’s female beauty paradigms changes themselves   |  Parent Interventions: Sleepless babies! Inactivity may be the culprit  |  Parent Interventions: How to teach kids to deal with money   |  Scholarships & Sponsorships: POST GRADUATE SCHOLARSHIP FOR SINGLE GIRL CHILD 2018-19  |  Technology Inceptions: Indian Robotics Company Emotix Launches Miko 2, a Companion for Children  |  Technology Inceptions: Samsung 860 QVO Affordable Multi-Terabyte Storage SSD Launched  |  Parent Interventions: Do not coerce your child for reluctant apology  |  Science Innovations: MIT engineers develop first-ever plane propelled by “ionic wind”  |  Parent Interventions: “Parentese” is good for infant’s language development  |  Technology Inceptions: First Gene-Edited Human Babies Claimed in China  |  
  • Pallikkutam Magazine
  • Companion Magazine
  • Mentor
  • Smart Board

June 28, 2018 Thursday 01:29:29 PM IST
School Camps Can Influence Positive Student, Teacher Relationships

Stepping outside the classroom and into the wilderness for an overnight school camp can be a daunting experience for many students.

But according to Sue Norton from the ACT Education and Learning Directorate, camps can provide great experiences for both students and teachers."Homesickness certainly was an issue for me," Ms Norton told ABC Radio Canberra's Adam Shirley, while recalling her first school camp when she was in grade six.

Despite her initial apprehension, Ms Norton has gone on to attend many school camps — as a student and then as a teacher."School camps are fantastic, and more and more schools are having them at the beginning of the year for a range of reasons," she said.

"One of them is that quality teaching is based on really strong, positive relationships."

Ms Norton said putting teachers and students in an outdoor learning environment could help expedite these relationships."It also gives teachers an opportunity to get to know children in a different environment outside the classroom," she said.

"You actually learn a myriad of things about students in that outdoor environment that would perhaps take a lot longer to learn in that learning environment."

However Ms Norton admitted school camps were not only trying for some students; they could also be challenging for teachers.

"You're on call 24/7," she said, giving the example of a child vomiting in the middle of the night. "If the students don't sleep, the teachers don't sleep either."

Ms Norton said preparation was the key to ensuring all involved had a positive experience.

"A lot of preparation is done to ensure that particularly those students in the high school feel supported and secure," she said."And a lot of team building happens".

"In the first instance, children might be reluctant to participate, but as time goes by and with encouragement and good values, children by the end of the camp are usually quite willing."

(Source: abc.net.au)


Comments