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March 21, 2019 Thursday 11:10:48 AM IST

Risk Taking in Children Influenced by Culture, Environment

Teacher Insights

Risk taking attitude in children may be influenced by culture and environment although traditionally women are considered to be more risk averse than men.

A study conducted by Elaine M.Liu and Sharon Xuejing Zuo of Fudan University among Chinese children coming from culturally distinct communities and living in a place called Yunnan. The Mosuo community is matrilineal while Han is patriarchal. When Mosuo girls started schooling they were prone to more risk taking than Mosuo boys while Han girls had more risk aversion than boys. However, by the age of eleven, Mosuo girls were found to be more risk averse as they spent more time with Han community.

The study proves that traditional behaviours and attitudes may be altered in children by interaction with other communities and circumstances although they are considered quite difficult to change.


Source: https://www.pnas.org/content/early/2019/03/12/1808336116

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