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July 03, 2019 Wednesday 08:51:57 AM IST

Reminding Children Of Their Multiple Roles Help in Problem Solving

Photo of Children by Jess Foami -Pixabay.com

Children get better with problem solving once they are reminded that they play multiple roles in life such as friend, son or daughter, niece, sister, according to a new research done by Duke University. 
The study reported in Developmental Science was based on a survey of 196 children in the age group of 6 and 7, all of them native English speakers. One group of children were reminded about their multiple identities such as daughter, friend, neighbour, niece while another group was reminded about their physical attributes such as mouth, arms and legs. Those reminded of multiple roles or identities did well in problem solving and creative thinking skills. When shown a picture  of a bear gazing at a honey-filled beehive up in the tree, they suggested flipping over a bowl which becomes a stool. They were also able to categories photos of faces when given a set of photos. They grouped them into smiling and unsmiling, old vs young and also on the basis of gender and race. 
The research proves that children reminded of their multiple roles become more flexible in thinking about race and other social groupings- a behaviour that could be of much use in an increasingly diverse society.

Source: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/action/doSearch?AllField=thinking+about+multiple+identities&SeriesKey=14677687



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