Education Information: AIM Launches India–Australia Circular Economy Hackathon(I-ACE)  |  Technology Inceptions: New age sustainable disinfectants may bring relief from chemical ones   |  National Edu News: Newly identified tectonically active zone could alter earthquake predictions  |  National Edu News: Education minister inaugurates new facilities of NIT Arunachal Pradesh  |  National Edu News: Sustainable Processing of Municipal Solid Waste: ‘Waste to Wealth’  |  Policy Indications: IIT & TCS set new trends in India’s advanced manufacturing sector  |  National Edu News: Foundation stone laid for the main Campus of IIT Palakkad  |  Science Innovations: Scientists uncover mystery behind decline of star formation rate  |  Education Information: Admission in Indian Forest Service (Main) Examination, 2020  |  Education Information: Result of The Civil Services (Preliminary) Examination, 2020  |  Leadership Instincts: Activity Technology During Covid Era and Beyond  |  Education Information: Conference on Women Safety and Sustainable Environment  |  Trending: Adaptive Leadership in Times of Crisis  |  Teacher Insights: 'Lab in a box' projects for home learning  |  Policy Indications: A global collaboration to move AI principles to practice  |  
October 26, 2018 Friday 11:30:21 AM IST

Relationships are the key to improving schools, not money!

Leadership Instincts

What is more important to improve the quality of schools? Lot of money? Or strong relationships between teachers, parents and students? A new study by Ohio State University researchers show that relationships at schools has more impact on improving student learning than does financial support. The results are scheduled to appear online in the Journal of Education for Students Placed at Risk.

Social capital is the name scientists give to the network of relationships between school officials, teachers, parents and the community that builds trust among stakeholders of education. The study found that social capital had a three- to five-times larger effect than financial capital to improve learning outcomes of students.

"When we talk about why some schools perform better than others, differences in the amount of money they have to spend is often assumed to be an explanation," said Roger Goddard, co-author of the study.

"We found that money is certainly important. But this study also shows that social capital deserves a larger role in our thinking about cost-effective ways to support students, especially the most vulnerable."


The study also suggests that schools can't "buy" social capital just by spending more money. Social relationships require a different kind of investment!

Research shows that the more teachers collaborate, the more they work together on instructional improvement, the higher the test scores of their students. That's because collaborative work builds social capital that provides students with access to valuable support.

"We need intentional effort by schools to build social capital. We can't leave it to chance."


Source: https://news.osu.edu/why-relationships--not-money--are-the-key-to-improving-schools/

Comments