Teacher Insights: Chocolate, the Right Food to Improve Your Brain Power  |  Leadership Instincts: Strong Bricks Can Be Made from Bio solids and Clay  |  Parent Interventions: Order of Birth in Family Has Influence on Intelligence  |  Cover Story: MIND THE NET  |  Technology Inceptions: Oppo’s 10X Lossless Hybrid Zoom Smartphone Camera Tech to Enter Mass Production   |  Technology Inceptions: AI Can Help Improve Understanding of Earth Science  |  Cover Story: THE CYBER BRAIN  |  Science Innovations: New treatment for osteoporosis   |  Technology Inceptions: SpaceX Protests NASA Launch Contract Award  |  Science Innovations: Cost-efficient catalysts  |  Technology Inceptions: NASA to Launch New Space Telescope in 2023 to Explore Origins of Universe  |  Leadership Instincts: Social Media Cannot Cause Depression  |  Parent Interventions: Maternal Grandmothers Can Raise Survival Rate of Grandchildren  |  Teacher Insights: Waking Up Early No Guarantee for Success  |  Teacher Insights: Ask your girl child to do science, not become scientist  |  
  • Pallikkutam Magazine
  • Companion Magazine
  • Mentor
  • Smart Board

February 06, 2019 Wednesday 03:49:29 PM IST
Regulator for immune system

A component has been identified by researchers in Umeå University, Sweden, as a novel regulator of the immune system. It acts as a molecular switch to deactivate the innate immune system and has the ability to prevent certain diseases caused by an excessive activation of the immune system. This is shown in a new doctoral thesis at the university.

Our innate immune system is activated when the body needs to protect itself against pathogenic organisms, such as bacteria and viruses, or heal injured tissue. In some people, the immune system overreacts, which can cause chronic inflammatory diseases and cancer.

Researchers identified MYSM1, a component of the ubiquitin (a small protein that is found in almost all cellular tissues) system, as a key regulator that stops excessive inflammation. They found that this molecule acts as a ‘rheostat’, which in response to innate immune stimuli, is turned in an ‘on and off’ manner to restore immune homeostasis (tendency towards a stable equilibrium).

Comments