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January 15, 2018 Monday 12:04:17 PM IST

READ ALOUD, AND REMEMBER BETTER!

Teacher Insights


Thought you already knew that? Well, a recent University of Waterloo study found that speaking text aloud, dubbed the 'production effect', helps to get words into long-term memory. Apparently it is the dual action of speaking and hearing oneself that has the most beneficial impact on memory.

"This study confirms that learning and memory benefit from active involvement," said Colin M. MacLeod, a professor and chair of the Department of Psychology at Waterloo, who co-authored the study with the lead author, post-doctoral fellow Noah Forrin.

The study tested four methods for learning written information -- reading silently, hearing someone else read, listening to a recording of oneself reading, and reading aloud in real time. Results from tests with 95 participants showed that the production effect of reading information aloud to yourself resulted in the best remembering.


"When we consider the practical applications of this research, I think of seniors who are advised to do puzzles and crosswords to help strengthen their memory," said MacLeod. "This study suggests that the idea of action or activity also improves memory."

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             (The study was recently published in the journal Memory)

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