Policy Indications: Harvard Teacher Fellows provides new teachers, local impact  |  International Edu News: Oxford's COVID-19 vaccine offers a high level of protection  |  Leadership Instincts: Harvard University CFAR announces leadership change  |  Parent Interventions: Virtual holiday toy and joy drive  |  Leadership Instincts: New Zealand PM to receive 2020 Gleitsman International Activist Award  |  International Edu News: Science and Innovation Fellowship accepting applications  |  Policy Indications: National Coalition calls for new White House-led focus on children and youth  |  Education Information: Faculty alter new first-year requirement because of continuing Covid-19  |  Leadership Instincts: Phiala Shanahan receives Kenneth G. Wilson Award  |  Leadership Instincts: Erik Demaine wins 2020 MIT Bose Award for Excellence in Teaching  |  Education Information: Second annual MIT Science Bowl Invitational takes virtual format  |  International Edu News: Meghan Davis named 2022 Mitchell Scholar  |  National Edu News: Multilateral cooperation is the key to overcoming global challenges: Minister  |  National Edu News: Tenth edition of National Science Film Festival kicks offin a virtual mode  |  Technology Inceptions: ‘WalkON Suit 4’ Releases Paraplegics from Wheelchairs​  |  
September 22, 2018 Saturday 11:06:00 AM IST

Quantum Dots: Duo is better than singles

Science Innovations

Researchers of Osaka University, Japan, developed a device that can track single electron events in a quantum dot in real time, which would be useful for the development of photonic devices and quantum computing.

Have you noticed the bright colours displayed on the background during stage shows, on advertisement boards, sign boards etc.? LEDs are mainly used for such bright displays that need huge amount of current for their operation. What if it is possible to display the full spectrum of colours with minimum usage of electricity. Quantum dots are doing just that.

Quantum dots are nanoparticles of semiconductor materials that display different colours when illuminated with light. They assemble all by themselves into different sizes during their formation and glow with a colour that depends on the size of the nanoparticle with which they are made up of. As they could be used for transferring quantum information, it is important to develop a way to measure the charge in a single self-assembled quantum dot.

Researchers at Osaka University, Japan have developed a device based on two self-assembled quantum dots of indium arsenide, in which one quantum dot can be used as a sensor to track the electron charge in the other quantum dot. The pair of quantum dots is found to perform much better than a single quantum dot in this regard.


According to the researchers, this device may find applications in improving the efficiency of solar cells and in quantum cryptography and quantum computing.

DOI: 10.1038/s41598-018-31268-x


Comments