Cover Story: WHEN FOOD COMES CALLING  |  Cover Story: Yours Online, Kudumbashree  |  Cover Story: DATE WITH THE DIGITAL  |  Rajagiri Round Table: IT'S E-S FOR SHOPPING  |  Technology Inceptions: Astrophysicists Count All the Starlight in the Universe  |  Leadership Instincts: China’s female beauty paradigms changes themselves   |  Parent Interventions: Sleepless babies! Inactivity may be the culprit  |  Parent Interventions: How to teach kids to deal with money   |  Scholarships & Sponsorships: POST GRADUATE SCHOLARSHIP FOR SINGLE GIRL CHILD 2018-19  |  Technology Inceptions: Indian Robotics Company Emotix Launches Miko 2, a Companion for Children  |  Technology Inceptions: Samsung 860 QVO Affordable Multi-Terabyte Storage SSD Launched  |  Parent Interventions: Do not coerce your child for reluctant apology  |  Science Innovations: MIT engineers develop first-ever plane propelled by “ionic wind”  |  Parent Interventions: “Parentese” is good for infant’s language development  |  Technology Inceptions: First Gene-Edited Human Babies Claimed in China  |  
  • Pallikkutam Magazine
  • Companion Magazine
  • Mentor
  • Smart Board

September 22, 2018 Saturday 11:06:00 AM IST
Quantum Dots: Duo is better than singles

Researchers of Osaka University, Japan, developed a device that can track single electron events in a quantum dot in real time, which would be useful for the development of photonic devices and quantum computing.

Have you noticed the bright colours displayed on the background during stage shows, on advertisement boards, sign boards etc.? LEDs are mainly used for such bright displays that need huge amount of current for their operation. What if it is possible to display the full spectrum of colours with minimum usage of electricity. Quantum dots are doing just that.

Quantum dots are nanoparticles of semiconductor materials that display different colours when illuminated with light. They assemble all by themselves into different sizes during their formation and glow with a colour that depends on the size of the nanoparticle with which they are made up of. As they could be used for transferring quantum information, it is important to develop a way to measure the charge in a single self-assembled quantum dot.

Researchers at Osaka University, Japan have developed a device based on two self-assembled quantum dots of indium arsenide, in which one quantum dot can be used as a sensor to track the electron charge in the other quantum dot. The pair of quantum dots is found to perform much better than a single quantum dot in this regard.

According to the researchers, this device may find applications in improving the efficiency of solar cells and in quantum cryptography and quantum computing.

DOI: 10.1038/s41598-018-31268-x

Comments