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September 22, 2018 Saturday 11:06:00 AM IST

Quantum Dots: Duo is better than singles

Science Innovations

Researchers of Osaka University, Japan, developed a device that can track single electron events in a quantum dot in real time, which would be useful for the development of photonic devices and quantum computing.

Have you noticed the bright colours displayed on the background during stage shows, on advertisement boards, sign boards etc.? LEDs are mainly used for such bright displays that need huge amount of current for their operation. What if it is possible to display the full spectrum of colours with minimum usage of electricity. Quantum dots are doing just that.

Quantum dots are nanoparticles of semiconductor materials that display different colours when illuminated with light. They assemble all by themselves into different sizes during their formation and glow with a colour that depends on the size of the nanoparticle with which they are made up of. As they could be used for transferring quantum information, it is important to develop a way to measure the charge in a single self-assembled quantum dot.

Researchers at Osaka University, Japan have developed a device based on two self-assembled quantum dots of indium arsenide, in which one quantum dot can be used as a sensor to track the electron charge in the other quantum dot. The pair of quantum dots is found to perform much better than a single quantum dot in this regard.


According to the researchers, this device may find applications in improving the efficiency of solar cells and in quantum cryptography and quantum computing.

DOI: 10.1038/s41598-018-31268-x


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