Parent Interventions: Headaches and online learning  |  Parent Interventions: E-cigarettes can be a ‘gateway’ to conventional cigarette smoking for teens   |  Parent Interventions: Thanksgiving meals for diabetic children  |  Technology Inceptions: Smart Speaker Determines Optimal Timing to Talk​  |  Teacher Insights: Teaching information literacy  |  Education Information: MISTI Global Seed Funds open for proposals after Covid pivot  |  Policy Indications: ‘Spill-over’ effects that improve the wider education system  |  Parent Interventions: Cambridge Dictionary names 'quarantine’ Word of the Year 2020   |  Policy Indications: Education Minister chairs a high-level review meeting on various schemes   |  Policy Indications: ‘Mitigation and Management of Covid-19: Practices from India’s States & UTs’  |  National Edu News: Cambridge University lauds National Education Policy of India  |  National Edu News: All Fixed to Mobile calls to be dialed with prefix ‘0’ from 15th January, 2021  |  National Edu News: Result of Combined Geo-Scientist (Main)Examination-2020  |  Policy Indications: Harvard Teacher Fellows provides new teachers, local impact  |  International Edu News: Oxford's COVID-19 vaccine offers a high level of protection  |  
July 16, 2019 Tuesday 11:20:25 AM IST

Quality Sleep for Teen Health

Parent Interventions

New research from the University of British Columbia suggests there are more benefits to a good night's sleep than simply feeling refreshed. Chronic, low-quality sleep was associated with poorer health outcomes among young students. Children who regularly had trouble falling or staying asleep were almost two and half times as likely to report sub-optimal or less than excellent health, compared to those who did not, according to the researchers.

The study, published in Preventive Medicine, looked at 3,104 students in British Columbia aged 13 to 17 years, over a period of two years.Even if these teens had difficulty falling asleep just one night a week, if that was a regular occurrence over two years, it really seemed to affect their overall health. What was particularly interesting was that the relationship between chronic, poor-quality sleep and health outcome was stronger in the boys than it was in the girls.


Comments