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October 29, 2020 Thursday 01:18:49 PM IST

Prospective parents' mental health associated with premature births

Parent Interventions

New research from King’s College London finds an association between the mental health of prospective parents and the likelihood of premature births. The research, co-led by King’s College London’s Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience and the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute (MCRI), found men with persistent mental health problems through adolescence and young adulthood were more likely to have a baby born premature. Women with anxiety and depression during pregnancy were more likely to have a preterm birth. The study was published in the journal EClinicalMedicine.


The study involved 398 women and 267 men from the Victorian Intergenerational Health Cohort Study (VIHCS) in Australia, who were assessed over 15 years for anxiety and depressive symptoms from adolescence to young adulthood and during subsequent pregnancies. These findings are observational and a causal relationship cannot be proven.

Researchers from Deakin University, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, University of Melbourne, Royal Women’s Hospital, Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health and the University of Bristol also contributed to the parental study findings.


(Content Courtesy: https://www.kcl.ac.uk/news/prospective-parents-mental-health-associated-with-premature-births)


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