Technology Inceptions: Apple's Latest iPhone 11 Range  |  Science Innovations: Wildflower Adapts to Climate Change  |  Parent Interventions: Family-School Initiative Benefits Students  |  Technology Inceptions: How to Reduce Heat Generated in Artificial Retina?  |  Science Innovations: How Uncertainty in Findings Impact Credibility of Climate Scientists  |  Teacher Insights: How Children Learn and Decide What to Teach  |  Health Monitor: New Solution to Reduce Tissue Damage in Heart Attack Developed  |  Education Information: AIIMS Bhubaneswar Got Second in Kayakalp Award for Second Year in a Row  |  Education Information: India gets maximum foreign students from Nepal, Karnataka for higher edu: HRD  |  Science Innovations: Caltech Scientists Discover Worms with Three Sexes  |  Education Information: Degree College Teachers Training Programme from 22nd Nov to 12th Dec 2019  |  Career News: ANNOUNCEMENT FOR THE POST OF JOINT DIRECTOR, (NCERT)  |  National Edu News: UGC guidelines on plastic use  |  International Edu News: Asian students converge on 5 countries  |  Health Monitor: Playing With Fire  |  
May 07, 2019 Tuesday 09:55:38 AM IST

Poverty’s mark on genes

Teacher Insights

Northwestern University, in a study, has challenged prevailing understanding of genes as immutable features of biology that are fixed at conception.

Previous research has shown that socio-economic status (SES) is a powerful determinant of human health and disease, and social inequality is a ubiquitous stressor for human populations globally. Lower educational attainment and/or income predict increased risk for heart disease, diabetes, many cancers and infectious diseases. Furthermore, lower SES is associated with physiological processes that contribute to the development of disease, including chronic inflammation, insulin resistance and cortisol dysregulation.

In this study, researchers found evidence that poverty can become embedded across wide swaths of the genome. They discovered that lower socio-economic status is associated with levels of DNA methylation (DNAm) - a key epigenetic mark that has the potential to shape gene expression - at more than 2,500 sites, across more than 1,500 genes. In other words, poverty leaves a mark on nearly 10 percent of the genes in the genome. 


Comments