Science Innovations: New research project on COVID-19 and misinformation  |  Leadership Instincts: Covid-19: McGill University provides job opportunities for students   |  Teacher Insights: McGill and Trafalgar School launch the CoLab  |  Parent Interventions: Prospective parents' mental health associated with premature births  |  Parent Interventions: Preparing your child for a COVID-19 test  |  Parent Interventions: How to decipher Covid-19 symptoms   |  Leadership Instincts: HKU launches “Rising Stars” Academic staff global recruitment campaign  |  Parent Interventions: Importance of investing resources in parent-child visitation programmes  |  National Edu News: ‘Electricity Access in India and Benchmarking Distribution Utilities’ report  |  Leadership Instincts: Dr Satish Mishra bags "DrTulsi Das Chugh Award-2020"  |  Technology Inceptions: Machine learning comes of age in cystic fibrosis   |  Leadership Instincts: YANA celebrates its 10th anniversary  |  Leadership Instincts: Three educators celebrated at Penn GSE  |  Policy Indications: Campus Advocates to promote University health and safety guidelines  |  Teacher Insights: Imperial and Twig to contribute to UNICEF's Learning Passport  |  
May 07, 2019 Tuesday 09:55:38 AM IST

Poverty’s mark on genes

Teacher Insights

Northwestern University, in a study, has challenged prevailing understanding of genes as immutable features of biology that are fixed at conception.

Previous research has shown that socio-economic status (SES) is a powerful determinant of human health and disease, and social inequality is a ubiquitous stressor for human populations globally. Lower educational attainment and/or income predict increased risk for heart disease, diabetes, many cancers and infectious diseases. Furthermore, lower SES is associated with physiological processes that contribute to the development of disease, including chronic inflammation, insulin resistance and cortisol dysregulation.

In this study, researchers found evidence that poverty can become embedded across wide swaths of the genome. They discovered that lower socio-economic status is associated with levels of DNA methylation (DNAm) - a key epigenetic mark that has the potential to shape gene expression - at more than 2,500 sites, across more than 1,500 genes. In other words, poverty leaves a mark on nearly 10 percent of the genes in the genome. 


Comments