National Edu News: UGC’s curriculum for life skills launched  |  International Edu News: Asian campus graduates outshine foreign educated  |  Prizes & Awards: UNESCO Invites Nominations for Carlos J Finlay Prize for Microbiology  |  Rajagiri Round Table: Question of Leadership  |  Finance: Micro Magic  |  Health Monitor: Get Rid of Cataract   |  Lifestyle: Say ‘No’ to Procrastination  |  Health Monitor: New Methods to Increase Success Rate of Islet Transplantation  |  Policy Indications: Science and Technology is the bedrock upon which the Country Relies   |  Policy Indications: Resources Management for Climate Smart Agriculture & Livelihood Security Begins   |  Education Information: Raksha Rajya Mantri inaugurates DRDO’s Igniter Complex at HEMRL, Pune  |  Policy Indications: Raksha Rajya Mantri inaugurates DRDO’s Igniter Complex at HEMRL, Pune  |  National Edu News: Kolkata students make Guinness World Records with largest Astrophysics assemble  |  Policy Indications: Kolkata students make Guinness World Records with largest Astrophysics assemble  |  Teacher Insights: Optimism Promises Prolonged Life  |  
October 23, 2019 Wednesday 09:26:14 AM IST

Posers helpful to students

Parent Interventions

When it comes to challenging young minds to grow language, asking how and why during shared book reading to pre-schoolers can be more beneficial, according to new research at the University of Texas Health Science Centre at Houston (UTHealth).

An analysis of the questions pre-school teachers asked during shared reading to their classes revealed that only 1 in 6 questions would be considered challenging. Researchers would like that number to be closer to 2 in 5. The findings appear in Early Childhood Research Quarterly.

A teachable moment is the zone when learning takes place because the child is being challenged; more challenging, open-ended questions and fewer that can be answered with a yes or no, are required, according to the findings.


Teachers can enhance the learning experience by asking more complex questions that offer students a challenge. Children's responses are driven by the kinds of questions that are asked.

Comments