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September 19, 2018 Wednesday 03:23:09 PM IST

Plastic magnets discovered

Science Innovations

Professor Jong-Beom Baek and his research team in the School of the Energy and Chemical Engineering at Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), South Korea have given a new direction in the field of magnetic materials. In the study, the research team has synthesized a new polymer material (Formed due to the self-polymerization of tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) monomer) which have ferromagnetic properties. The results are published in the journal Chem.

For over two decades, there has been widespread skepticism around claims of organic plastic ferromagnetism. Extensive effort has been devoted to developing magnets in purely organic compounds based on free radicals, driven by both scientific curiosity and the potential applications of a 'plastic magnet'.

Professor Baek and team has reported the design, synthesis, and magnetic properties of a triazine network polymer demonstrating room-temperature ferromagnetism derived from pure organic single crystals. The presence of unpaired electrons (radicals) in the material, which provides the material with magnetic properties, was confirmed by solid-state electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy.


DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chempr.2018.07.006

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