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June 13, 2019 Thursday 10:45:29 AM IST

Picky-eating tots get constipation

Parent Interventions

Researchers at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago have found that normally developing pre-school children with chronic constipation have underlying sensory issues associated with toileting behaviours. These children are mostly picky eaters who are overly fascinated by food textures, tastes, or odours. They also tend to exhibit an exaggerated response to noises, bright lights, or other sensory stimuli. Feeding problems due to sensory sensitivities are especially common among these children. Such issues are best addressed when kids are under 5, before maladaptive behaviours become more entrenched. Comprehensive interventional care of these children includes tackling of sensory issues and possible reference to occupational therapy. Enticing strategies to increase the child’s daily fibre and water intake could be adopted.

Make having a bowel movement part of your child’s routine. Children who are facilitated to watch others eating a variety of foods in a relaxed setting could become motivated to participate. Repeated exposure to new food is required before a ‘picky’ child is willing to eat. 


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