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August 08, 2017 Tuesday 12:22:49 PM IST

Pichai against controversial memo

Technology Inceptions

San Francisco: Google CEO Sunder Pichai has cut his vacation short to deal with the crisis over an anti-diversity "manifesto" that went viral inside the company and infuriated thousands of employees.

The tech giant has also reportedly fired the engineer who wrote the 10-page memo, which claimed that "the representation gap between men and women in software engineering persists because of biological differences between the two sexes". According to a reports, Pichai condemned portions of the controversial memo that argued that women are not "biologically fit" for tech roles.

Pichai said parts of the 3,300-word 'manifesto' crossed the line by "advancing harmful gender stereotypes" in the workplace. "Our job is to build great products for users that make a difference in their lives," he wrote in an email.

"To suggest a group of our colleagues have traits that make them less biologically suited to that work is offensive and not OK. Clearly there's a lot more to discuss as a group, including how we create a more inclusive environment for all," Pichai added.


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