Technology Inceptions: NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory back in action  |  Science Innovations: GenNext Solar Cells with Record-breaking efficiency invented  |  Science Innovations: Canadian researchers develop world’s fastest camera   |  Science Innovations: Scientists discover “ultra-stripped supernova”, the origin of gold and platinum   |  Parent Interventions: Why do bees stop buzzing during a total solar eclipse?   |  Parent Interventions: Lie detection is not an easy task  |  Teacher Insights: Can we learn while sleeping?  |  Teacher Insights: Sitting up straight boosts math performance  |  Science Innovations: Engineers design molecules that store thermal energy   |  Technology Inceptions: Russia May Bring Forward Manned Launch After Rocket Failure  |  Technology Inceptions: New Nokia Smartphone's India Launch Expected Today, how to Watch Live Stream  |  Science Innovations: Kahne Lab prepares to combat superbugs   |  Teacher Insights: False beliefs die hard  |  Science Innovations: New wayto convert metals to superconductors  |  Technology Inceptions: Willmott Dixon Trials 'Bionic' Vest  |  
  • Pallikkutam Magazine
  • Companion Magazine
  • Mentor
  • Smart Board

October 04, 2018 Thursday 12:25:22 PM IST
Physical literacy is vital to the GenNext

The results of research project led by the Healthy Active Living and Obesity Research Group (HALO),Canada indicates that two-thirds of Canadian children haven't achieved an acceptable level of physical literacy. The results are published in the journal BMC Public Health.

Physical literacy is more than just fitness or motor skill; it includes the motivation, confidence, physical competence, knowledge and understanding to value and take responsibility for engagement in physical activities for life.

"We hear about increasing obesity rates in kids, falling rates of physical activity and more time spent in front of screens," said Dr. Mark Tremblay, Director of HALO and Professor of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa. "Physical literacy looks at different domains in children to give a better overall picture of children's healthy active living and future health. Physically literate children are more active and healthy children, which sets them up for life."

The results invite every organization concerned with the well-being of children, whether provincial governments, municipal public health and recreation departments, boards of education and sports or recreation groups, should allocate additional resources to increase children's physical literacy.

Source: http://www.capl-eclp.ca

Comments