Parent Interventions: 10 Things Children Will Always Remember  |  Parent Interventions: How to Communicate With and Listen to Your Teen  |  Parent Interventions: Why Do Teens Lie?  |  Science Innovations: What a Pain: The iPad Neck Plagues Women More  |  Technology Inceptions: Protecting Communications from Hackers  |  Technology Inceptions: Crumple Up This Keyboard and Stick It In Your Pocket  |  Science Innovations: Parent Explanations of Peer Interactions Matter  |  Technology Inceptions: Helping English Learners With Math Word Problems  |  Policy Indications: Multi-Pronged Reforms Needed In Higher Education: Shashi Tharoor  |  Leadership Instincts: The Most Successful Leaders Do 15 Things Automatically, Every Day  |  Parent Interventions: How to Help Teens Find Purpose  |  Teacher Insights: Help Them to Have a Purpose   |  Leadership Instincts: Make the Leap to Meaningful Work  |  Parent Interventions: Five Ways to Help Teens Feel Good about Themselves  |  Teacher Insights: The Surprising Benefits of Teaching a Class Outside  |  
  • Pallikkutam Magazine
  • Companion Magazine
  • Mentor
  • Smart Board

March 07, 2018 Wednesday 01:03:00 PM IST
PERSONALISED CURRICULUM APPEALING TO STUDENTS

Concentrating on their “personal DNA and genealogies”, middle-school students seem to have learned as much as peers who used “case studies”, says a Penn State researcher. “We noticed that both groups got the content, but once all was said and done, the case study group would have preferred to do the work on themselves,” says Elizabeth Wright, a postdoctoral scholar at Nina Jablonski, Evan Pugh Professor of Anthropology, Penn State. At a camp held at Penn State, the University of South Carolina, and the American Museum of Natural History, middle-school scientists sought answers to the question “Who am I?”Among other topics at the camp were instruction and investigation into personal DNA, family genealogy, anthropology, health, and evolution. Three sets of campers studied their personal family histories and DNA while another group focused on case-study data. A fifth group became the basis for an online video series “Finding Your Roots: The Seedlings”. “The initial data support our hypothesis that middle-school students prefer learning about themselves,” says Wright. “While learning gains were the same between the personal and case-study camps, as soon as the case-study campers had the opportunity to do personalised research, most campers took it.”

Comments