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November 12, 2019 Tuesday 02:25:29 PM IST

People with Higher Education Live Longer and With Less Morbidity

Photo by Susanne Palmer

A study done by researchers at University of Geneva has found that life expectancy along with quality of life will improve with increase in education. 
Those who only attended compulsory schooling also lived longer but in poor health. Between 1990 and 2015, the life expectancy of Swiss men rose from 78 to 82 years, while for Swiss women it increased from 83 to 86 years. But are these additional years of life spent in good health or do they only prolong the development of morbidity? “The principle of morbidity expansion means that, yes, life expectancy is on the rise, but that these same individuals are spending more years in poor health before they finally die”, explains Adrien Remund, a researcher at the Institute of Demography and Socioeconomics in UNIGE’s Faculty of Social Sciences (SDS), and first author of the study. 
The study assessesed the educational levels of the Swiss population on the socio-economic factor of education depending on whether they completed compulsory, secondary or teritiary studies. According to Organisation of Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD), people with compulsory and tertiary education differ in their socio-economic inequalities. Lower income may force people to put off regular checkups or avoid screenings as they are costly and not covered by health insurance.



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