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November 29, 2019 Friday 01:26:54 PM IST

Passion Not Enough to Become Dynamic Leaders

Leadership Instincts

Passion may not be enough to make managers into dynamic leaders, according to Jon M Jachimowicz, Harvard Business School Assistant Professor.He his team did a series of six studies to understand passion at the work place and found that there is more to leadership than just passion for the job. In the first study they examined the presentations of 177 entrepreneurs in the Canadian television show Dragon's Den. It was found that those who were perceived as passionate about their projects got more offers. In the second study, the participants were inclined to open their wallets to only those with a genuine passion. 
Passion doesn't work for all jobs. For eg. consultants should express passion but not accountants, judges should not be passionate but lawyers can be. Researchers found that people only support passionate colleagues if they agree with their cause.When participants in a fourth study read about workers who were passionate about environmental issues, only participants sympathetic with those views showed admiration. The others turned their backs. 
So Jachimowicz advises: “If I’m a leader in a company or team, just expressing passion won’t necessarily make people agree with me and help me succeed. Maybe I should work on getting everyone on board with the goal first.”



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