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July 24, 2018 Tuesday 07:52:29 AM IST

Parent-child relationship and shaping behaviour

Parent Interventions

Father and mother, you are being observed by your child!

When a child is born, it doesn’t belong to any particular land, language or social behaviour. Other than the characters governed by genetic factors, the child learns everything from the surroundings.

A child gradually acquires the patterns of social behaviours by observing and imitating others. Experiences from the surroundings add new knowledge, behaviours, skills, values and preferences and also modify the existing ones.

Social Learning approaches put forward by eminent researchers underline that learning is a cognitive process that takes place in a social context. Cognitive process means that something “connected with thinking or conscious mental processes”( https://dictionary.cambridge.org)  


Social Learning Theory argues that child’s real-life experiences and exposures directly or indirectly shape behavior. The immediate rewards or punishments received for behaviours lead to reinforcement and conditioning.

Children learn strategies about managing their emotions, resolving disputes and engaging with others in two ways

1.       From their experiences and

2.       From the way their own reactions were responded to.


Positive dimensions of parenting promote child’s positive behaviour and affect the nature of interactions between parent and child. At the same time parental conflict, coercion and consistent discipline can lead to aggressive and negative behaviour in children. 


(Indebted to various sources) 


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