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July 13, 2018 Friday 07:43:20 PM IST

Parental style: classification and outcome

Parent Interventions

Parental style as perceived by children is composed of two main dimensions: demandingness and responsiveness

Demandingness describes parental expectations that are related to children’s behavior and socialization. Responsiveness implies parents’ general tendency of providing warmth, support and a positive attitude towards their child’s attitude.

The study by Diana Baumrind classifies parental style into four categories: authoritative, authoritarian, permissive and neglectful.

Authoritative parenting:  warm and responsive and with clear rules, emphasizes on high expectations, and also provides support and value independence.


The outcomes of such parenting are found to be higher academic performance, more self esteem, better social skills, less mental illness and lower delinquency.  

Authoritarian Style:  unresponsive, strict rules, high expectation and expect blind obedience.

The results of this style are found to be lower academic performance, less self esteem, poorer social skills, mental illness, drug/alcohol abuse, delinquency.

Permissive style: warm and responsive, a few or no rules, indulgent, lenient.


The end results on children are predicted as impulsive behavior, ego-centric, poorer social skills and problematic relationship.   

Neglectful parental style:  cold and unresponsive, no rules, uninvolved, indifferent.

The associated outcomes highlighted are impulsive behavior, delinquency, drug and alcohol abuse and suicides.  


                                                                                                                                                                        (indebted to various sources)


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