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November 15, 2019 Friday 09:58:21 AM IST

Parental role key to child’s achievement

Parent Interventions

Parental engagement has a positive effect on a child's academic attainment - regardless of age or socio-economic status, according to a study conducted by the Universities of Plymouth and Exeter. The study explored areas of promise pertaining to schools and early years’ settings that can support parents in a way that improve their children's learning.

Home-school partnership is hugely important - especially where schools personalise communications about a child's progress and make them accessible, for example, through text messages.
The study threw light onthe impact of family literacy interventions that boost younger children's learning, and summer reading programmes that improve school-aged children's learning, particularly among families belonging to disadvantaged backgrounds.
The researchers reviewed existing international studies on the links between parental engagement and students' learning, and comparing the findings with survey responses from  over 180 schools across England. It was concluded that schools need resources, systems and structures to create a continuity of care and education that involves parents.

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