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May 07, 2019 Tuesday 10:05:56 AM IST

Parental role in millennial transition

Parent Interventions

How well parents or guardians support millennials' psychological needs prior to their transition to college is an important predictor of their psychological well-being as they adapt to college life. A new study published in The Journal of Social Psychology has assessed the role of parental relationships in mitigating millennials' worry prior to college transition by meeting their basic psychological needs of autonomy, competence and relatedness. The research discovered that millennials who perceive their parental relationships as supportive of their psychological needs are less likely to worry and adjust better to the transition to college, whereas parenting characterised by over-involvement and control leads to less need satisfaction, higher levels of worry and poor psychological well-being. Parents, peers and educators should support millennial students' basic needs for autonomy, competence and relatedness both before and after the transition to college, as they are essential to their overall psychological health.

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