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February 19, 2021 Friday 04:22:05 PM IST

Oxford to collaborate with Janssen

The University of Oxford has entered into a strategic collaboration with Janssen Biotech, Inc., one of the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson. Through the collaboration, Oxford academics will work with Janssen scientists to develop a cellular map of genes and proteins implicated across a range of immune-mediated inflammatory disorders and characterize pharmacologically relevant therapeutic targets. The agreement was facilitated by Johnson & Johnson Innovation.

Immune-mediated inflammatory disorders affect a large proportion of the population. Genetic association studies, functional studies, and clinical observations suggest that there is substantial overlap between immune-mediated inflammatory disorders affecting different organ systems, but the cellular mechanisms are largely unknown.

This 3-year data-driven study will apply the latest molecular and cellular multiomics analysis platforms, and computational methods to deliver insights for target selection and precision medicine for inflammatory disease indications of the intestine, the joint, and the skin where existing options for therapeutic intervention are limited. The collaboration will create four new postdoctoral positions at the University of Oxford.



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