International Edu News: Customized courses make Singapore a suitable overseas Education Destination  |  National Edu News: Seminar on water by Richard N Zare at IISER Pune on Nov 25  |  Technology Inceptions: Apple Changing How It Develops Its Software After Buggy iOS 13 Debut  |  Teacher Insights: Unstable income in young age hits brain  |  Policy Indications: Research & Development and Training in Ayurveda & Traditional Medicine  |  Science Innovations: New system to control blood glucose levels  |  International Edu News: Foreign-run schools under scrutiny in China  |  Management lessons: UNIGE to Launch Business Center to Sensitize Industry on Human Rights  |  Technology Inceptions: Harman Kardon Citation Series home speakers launched  |  Teacher Insights: Parental roles improve life satisfaction  |  Parent Interventions: Distinct types of teen popularity identified  |  Policy Indications: Hybrid Annuity Model for National Highways  |  Policy Indications: IFFI@50 will inform, educate and attract Youth and Children   |  Leadership Instincts: Need to Create Safe Homes and Safe Neighborhoods  |  Health Monitor: Ayurveda Medicines for Treating Lifestyle Diseases  |  
August 23, 2017 Wednesday 05:11:31 PM IST

Over 500 'spying' apps removed from Play Store

Technology Inceptions

San Francisco: Google has removed over 500 apps that included mobile games for teenagers from its Play Store on account of a spyware threat.

The decision came after US-based cyber-security firm Lookout discovered more than 500 apps that could spread spyware on mobile phones, Fortune reported late on Wednesday.

According to Lookout, the apps used certain software that had the ability to covertly siphon people's personal data on their devices without alerting the app makers.

The impacted apps included mobile games for teenagers, weather apps, online radio, photo editing, education, health, fitness and home video camera apps.


The researchers discovered that the 'Igexin' advertising software development kit (SDK) embedded in the apps caused these to communicate with outside servers that had earlier spread malware.

The bug in SDK was discovered when an app appeared to be downloading large, encrypted files from those servers. Many of the developers of the impacted apps were unaware of the security flaws, the report added.

Comments