Technology Inceptions: India to Establish One lakh Digital Villages: Ravi Shankar Prasad  |  Best Practices: FSSAI to Impose Curbs on Promoting Unhealthy Products in School Premises  |  Management lessons: E-Services Most Important in Design of Smart Tourism Organisation  |  Rajagiri Round Table: 'Draft New Educational Policy Comprehensive, Hurdles Likely in Implementation'  |  International Edu News: Estonian schools promote English  |  Technology Inceptions: Microsoft AI Helps Leading Naukrigulf.com Attract More Jobseekers, Employers  |  Technology Inceptions: Microsoft To Set up AI Digital Labs in Association With 10 Universities  |  Science Innovations: IIT Guwahati Develops Simple Technique to Check Milk Quality  |  Teacher Insights: Rural-Urban Divide Among Animals Too- The Case of Bengaluru Lizards  |  Technology Inceptions: Steam game streaming for iPhone, Apple TV   |  Parent Interventions: Picky-eating tots get constipation  |  National Edu News: Check AIIMS MBBS Exam Results @aiimsexams.org  |  Higher Studies: EducationUSA India Mobile App Launched  |  International Edu News: Indian Student Enrolments in US Universities Double in a Decade  |  Policy Indications: IIT Delhi To Study How Much Heat Stress You Can Endure  |  
  • Pallikkutam Magazine
  • Companion Magazine
  • Mentor
  • Smart Board
  • Pallikkutam Publications

December 01, 2017 Friday 03:13:05 PM IST

Once Your child gets to High School

Parent Interventions

A checklist:

Be involved. It’s a great idea to attend parent meetings and learn as much as you can about the curriculum and assignments. Contact teachers or the school counselor if you have questions. Don’t assume that, now that your child is in high school, s/he can handle things on their own. Attend school events or volunteer for a committee. Stay connected to the school to really know what’s going on, because your child is not likely to tell you!

Course selection: listen to the experts. It’s critical to pay attention to any teacher recommendations for courses. They work with their students day in and day out and they know how that student learns, completes work, and performs on tests. I’ve heard many parents say, “but I know Johnny can do this” and my immediate response is, “I agree that Johnny can do this, but will he?” Parents need to be realistic, yet supportive, about their kids. Talk to the previous teacher, talk with the school counselor, and look at past grades and habits. Then choose courses that will stretch your child a bit, but not overwhelm him.

Help with the balancing act between academics, athletics, and social life. We want our children to be successful students, to feel connected to their school, and to have friends and activities for fun times, but it all has to be carefully balanced. First, school should be a student’s priority. It’s critical to have a set time and place to study and do homework. Insist that your child does the homework. After all, practice makes perfect.

Be a parent, not a pal. In high school there will be parties, movies, and just hanging out. Set reasonable expectations regarding how often you want your child to go out. Monitor who they are with and where they are going, as well as what they are doing. You will be labeled “over-protective” but that’s ok. Be a parent, not a pal. Setting firm boundaries and expectations, demanding respect and courtesy, and allowing natural consequences for screw-ups will actually be appreciated by your kids.


Comments