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June 24, 2019 Monday 09:59:55 AM IST

OCD from feeling of responsibility

Teacher Insights

A new study has found that people who reported intense feelings of responsibility were susceptible to developing Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) or Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) was published in the International Journal of Cognitive Therapy

People with OCD are tortured by repeatedly occurring negative thinking and they take some strategy to prevent it; GAD is a very pervasive type of anxiety. Patients worry about everything, according to researchers at the University of Hiroshima.

Anxiety and OCD-like behaviours, such as checking if the door is locked, are common in the general population. However, it is the frequency and intensity of these behaviours or feelings that make the difference between a character trait and disorder. The team identified 3 types of inflated responsibility: (1) Responsibility to prevent or avoid danger and/or harm; (2) Sense of personal responsibility and blame for negative outcomes; (3) Responsibility to continue thinking about a problem. To establish whether inflated responsibility was a predictor of OCD or GAD, the researchers conducted a survey which found that respondents who scored higher in questions about responsibility were more likely to exhibit behaviours that resemble those of OCD or GAD patients. 


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