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September 27, 2019 Friday 04:47:56 AM IST

Object-label better way to learn

Parent Interventions

A new study held at Dartmouth College could hold the key to learning languages, teaching children colours or even studying complex theories.

The research, published in Cognitive Science, adds to the existing evidence that adults, children and students of all ages learn better when seeing an object before hearing its description.

For the study, researchers employed three fictional characters using two types of learning methods.The first method, ‘object-label learning’, is when a student sees an object first and then is provided with the label. This means seeing a colour before being told its name. Or hearing a description of a physical force before hearing its formal title.


The second learning procedure is ‘label-object learning’, the reverse order in which a student sees a label first.The students who see objects first and then hear the name,perform ‘frequency boosting’ - the ability to process inconsistent information to identify and use the most frequent rule. 

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