Guest Column: The Death of the Creative Writer!  |  Teacher Insights: Why the Boom in Private Tuition Business?  |  Technology Inceptions: More Heat Resilient Silver Circuitry  |  Science Innovations: Silica Nanoparticles for Precise Drug Targetting  |  National Edu News: IIT Hyderabad Improves in QS World University Rankings to 591-600  |  Technology Inceptions: C02 Emissions to Be Made into Animal Feed  |  Leadership Instincts: Blockchain Helping UN Interventions to End Poverty and Hunger  |  National Edu News: Three Indian Institutions in Top 200 of QS World University Rankings  |  Management lessons: Vaccines, Social Distancing, Facemasks Essential Tools to Fight Covid-19  |  Education Information: “The Language Network” to revolutionise language learning  |  Guest Column: Noetic Future Shock!  |  Rajagiri Round Table: Appropriate Pedagogy of the Digital Natives  |  Science Innovations: How to Reduce Animal Experimentation in Medicine?  |  National Edu News: Jammu & Kashmir MSMEs enlighten themselves with CSIR-CMERI Advanced Oxygen Tech  |  Teacher Insights: Brain Syncs Hearing with Vision  |  
May 20, 2019 Monday 01:01:59 PM IST

Obesity hastens puberty

Teacher Insights

Girls are not the only ones who go through puberty early if they have obesity. Boys with obesity enter puberty at an earlier age than average. Boys aged 4 to 7 years, having both total body obesity and central obesity, or excess belly fat, were associated with greater odds of starting puberty before age 9, according to researchers from the University of Chile in Santiago. Early puberty - called precocious puberty - is linked to possible problems including stunted growth and emotional-social problems.

Precocious puberty reportedly occurred in 9 per cent. Total obesity and central obesity from ages 4 to 7 raised the odds of early puberty compared with having a healthy weight.

Early puberty might increase the risk of behaviour problems and in boys could be related to a higher incidence of testicular cancer in adulthood. Controlling the obesity epidemic in children could be useful in decreasing these risks.


Comments