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March 26, 2018 Monday 04:19:30 PM IST

Now Your Teeth can Keep You Healthy!

Science Innovations

Wireless sensors are creating wonders nowadays. Researchers have developed a tiny wireless sensor which can be attached to the teeth. It can detect the chemicals in its environment.  It will sense what's being chewed on in the mouth. 

It is a 2mm x 2mm device, sandwiched between two gold rings (square shaped). The rings act as antennas that can transmit the information.  The type of compound the inner layer detects determines the spectrum and intensity of the radiofrequency waves that the sensor transmits. Because the sensor uses the ambient radio-frequency signals that are already around us, it doesn't need a power supply.

The team tested this on people who took alcohol, mouthwash, soup etc. Each time the sensor correctly detected each item by identifying the nutrients. More testing on advanced material will happen in the next phase of the experiment.

The devices could help health care and clinical researchers find links between dietary intake and health and, in the long run, allow each of us to keep track of how what we consume is affecting our bodies.



(Source: Sciencemag)


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