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March 27, 2018 Tuesday 11:52:28 AM IST

Now You will Get Water from Air in Desert!

Technology Inceptions

It is a well know fact that the air will have some moisture however dry the place be. getting drinkable water from the atmosphere could be a key to survival in such situations. Now, researchers at MIT have proved that such an extraction system can work.

The new device, based on a concept the team first proposed last year, has now been field-tested in the very dry air of Tempe, Arizona, confirming the potential of the new method, though much work remains to scale up the process, the researchers say.

The system, based on relatively new high-surface-area materials called metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), can extract potable water from even the driest of desert air, the researchers say, with relative humidities as low as 10 percent. Current methods for extracting water from air require much higher levels -- 100 percent humidity for fog-harvesting methods, and above 50 percent for dew-harvesting refrigeration-based systems, which also require large amounts of energy for cooling. So the new system could potentially fill an unmet need for water even in the world's driest regions.

By running a test device on a rooftop at Arizona State University in Tempe, the team field-tested the device in a place that's representative of these arid areas, and showed that we can actually harvest the water, even in subzero dewpoints."


The test device was powered solely by sunlight, and although it was a small proof-of-concept device, if scaled up its output would be equivalent to more than a quarter-liter of water per day per kilogram of MOF.

(Source: Massachusetts Institute of Technology

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