Best Practices: Enriching Learning at School, A Dubai School Sets an Example  |  Career News: Huge Opportunities for Public Policy Professionals in Corporate Sector  |  International Edu News: USCIS Implements eProcessing for Citizenship and Immigration Services  |  International Edu News: Harvard, MIT, Stanford, Oxford Tops World University Rankings  |  Career News: ICSI to Setup More Study Centres In India  |  Career News: Chartered Accountants: ICAI Placement Programme Helps 3180 Candidates Get Jobs  |  Parent Interventions: Trust in Government Schools Lower in Rural and Urban Households: IIMA Survey  |  Higher Studies: Where to Get Authentic Information on Medicine Courses Offered Abroad?  |  Best Practices: IP Nani, The Tech-Savvy Grandma-Son Helps Govt Tackle IP Crimes  |  Technology Inceptions: IP Nani, The Tech-Savvy Grandma-Son Helps Govt Tackle IP Crimes  |  Best Practices: CISCE Encourages Schools to Create Awareness About IPRs  |  Teacher Insights: CISCE Encourages Schools to Create Awareness About IPRs  |  Education Information: HSCAP Kerala Plus One allotment list released   |  National Edu News: Scholarships for women to pursue master’s programs in engineering at IISC  |  National Edu News: Indo-U.S. Fellowship for Women in STEMM (WISTEMM)  |  
  • Pallikkutam Magazine
  • Companion Magazine
  • Mentor
  • Smart Board
  • Pallikkutam Publications

April 26, 2019 Friday 11:03:35 AM IST
New tech for infrared cameras

There's an entire world our eyes miss, hidden in the ranges of light wavelengths that human eyes can't see. But infrared cameras can pick up the secret light emitted as plants photosynthesize, as cool stars burn and batteries get hot. They can see through smoke and fog and plastic.

But infrared cameras are much more expensive than visible-light ones. A new breakthrough by scientists with the University of Chicago, however, may one day lead to much more cost-effective infrared cameras - which in turn could enable infrared cameras for common consumer electronics like phones, as well as sensors to help automatic cars see their surroundings more accurately.

Collecting multiple wavelengths within the infrared gives you more spectral information - it's like adding colour to black-and-white TV.  They tweaked the quantum dots so that they had a formula to detect short-wave infrared and one for mid-wave infrared. Then they laid both together on top of a silicon wafer. The resulting camera performs extremely well and is much easier to produce.


Comments