Policy Indications: Professional College Fees Must be Non-Exploitative  |  Parent Interventions: As a Studious Girl Destroyed Her Mobile Phone  |  Teacher Insights: Know about how to choose the best MPPSC coaching institute  |  National Edu News: Swinburne University of Technology & IIT H launch the joint doctoral program  |  Policy Indications: India & Japan collaborations for innovations on Hydrogen based technologies  |  National Edu News: Education Minister addresses at the Annual Convocation of IIM Rohtak  |  Education Information: UPSC postpones tests and Interviews of some examinations  |  National Edu News: Piyush Goyal launches the Startup India Seed Fund Scheme  |  Teacher Insights: Are you Proficient in English?  |  National Edu News: National climate vulnerability assessment sees 8 states as highly vulnerable  |  National Edu News: Education minister e-launches long-lasting hygiene product DuroKea Series  |  National Edu News: Punjab’s new nutrient rich crop varieties can satisfy India's nutritional needs   |  Guest Column: Delicious Dhabas  |  International Edu News: 2D Perovskites for Solar Cells and LEDS  |  International Edu News: AI Model for Predicting Tsunami  |  
January 09, 2020 Thursday 03:15:27 PM IST

New System to Learn Arithmetic Easily

Teacher Insights

The University of Geneva (UNIGE) has developed a new system to make learning of arithmetic easier for school students. Titled ACE-ArithmEcole, the programme is designed to help school children surpass their intuitions and informal knowledge, and rely instead on the use of arithmetic principles. The approach based on semantic re-encoding helps students to gain knowledge in arithmetic at a very young age. 

At the conclusion of the tests, researchers observed undeniable results. Amongst students who had learned to solve mathematical problems with the ACE-ArithmEcole method, 63.4% gave correct answers to the problems that were easy to simulate mentally, and 50.5% found the answers to the more complex problems. “In contrast, only 42.2% of the pupils in the standard curriculum succeeded in solving simple problems, and only 29.8% gave the right answer to the complex problems,” exclaims Katarina Gvozdic, a researcher at the Faculty of Psychology and Education (FPSE) in UNIGE.

Comments