Parent Interventions: Music improves communication skills of autistic children   |  Teacher Insights: Do you undergo ‘social jet lag’?  |  Parent Interventions: Social media could affect self-esteem of women  |  Technology Inceptions: Raspberry Pi 3 Model A+ With 512MB RAM, 5GHz Wi-Fi Connectivity Launched  |  Technology Inceptions: AMD Radeon RX 590 Mid-Range GPU Announced for Full-HD PC Gaming  |  Leadership Instincts: When ‘small changes’ better than ‘no change’ at all  |  Science Innovations: Alexa and Siri may in future learn language as kids do!  |  Teacher Insights: Ideas are contagious as disease  |  Science Innovations: Universe: Why is there something, instead of nothing?  |  Technology Inceptions: NASA's Hubble Telescope finds smiling face in space  |  Cover Story: HOME TRANSFORMERS FAMILIES WILL NEVER BE THE SAME  |  Cover Story: Thou shalt not discriminate  |  Rajagiri Round Table: FOR AN EQUAL SHARE OF THE PIE  |  Teacher Insights: People who breathe through their noses consolidate their memories better  |  Technology Inceptions: Driverless car technology may make traffic lights obsolete  |  
  • Pallikkutam Magazine
  • Companion Magazine
  • Mentor
  • Smart Board

August 03, 2018 Friday 12:12:03 PM IST
New “sponge” to clear rivers

Dyes are widely used in industries such as textiles, cosmetics, food processing, papermaking and plastics. Globally, we produce about 700,000 metric tons -- the weight of two Empire State Buildings -- of dye each year to color our clothing, eye shadow, toys and vending machine candy. Even just a little added color can block sunlight and prevent plant photosynthesis, which disrupts the entire aquatic ecosystem. A team led by the University of Washington has created an environmentally friendly way to remove color from dyes in water in a matter of seconds. The technique was described in a paper published online in June in the journal Applied Catalysis B: Environmental.

The research team developed a method that removes color from water using a sponge-like material they created from wood pulp and small bits of metal. Cellulose, the main structure in plant cell walls and the most abundant natural material on Earth, provides the backbone of the material, which is decorated with tiny pieces of palladium. This metal serves as a catalyst to help remove color quickly. They change the color of the dye by chemical reaction instead of removing the dye completely from water.

Comments