Parent Interventions: Navigating through the Pandemic  |  Health Monitor: Attention and Memory Deficits in People Who Experienced Mild Covid  |  Parent Interventions: How can we Revert Peanut Allergies in Children?  |  Teacher Insights: Play Based Learning has a Positive Impact on Child's Learning and Development  |  Health Monitor: Social Media Use Likely to Affect the Physical Health of a Person  |  Parent Interventions: How to Deal with Developmental Language Disorder in Children  |  Health Monitor: Lifestyle Interventions from Early Childhood Prevents Cardiovascular Diseases  |  Teacher Insights: Teacher Expectations Can Have Powerful Impact on Students Academic Achievement  |  Policy Indications: Make Sure the Digital Technology Works for Public Good  |  Teacher Insights: The Significance of Social Emotional Learning Curriculum in Schools  |  Health Monitor: Forgetting is a Form of Learning  |  Higher Studies: University of Manchester Invites Application for LLB and LLM Programmes   |  Health Monitor: Is There a Blue Spot Inside our Brain?  |  Parent Interventions: Babies born during the Pandemic Performs Lower during Developmental Screening  |  Policy Indications: Invest in Structural Steel R&D : Prof BS Murty  |  
November 26, 2019 Tuesday 10:11:22 AM IST

New light on molecular attraction

Science Innovations

Whether a surface is hydrophobic or hydrophilic is determined by the degree of molecular attraction between the substrate and the liquid.

Controlling the attraction is key to the wettability of substrates, which determines how many physical and biological systems function. For instance, plant leaves are often hydrophobic, allowing them to remain dry during rain so that gas exchange can occur through their pores. However, liquids such as paints, inks and lubricants are required to spread out to coat or 'wet' surfaces.

Researchers at University of Bristol from the School of Physics applied a number of theoretical and simulation techniques and discovered rich and unexpected behaviour such as divergent density fluctuations associated with the phenomenon of 'critical drying' at a superhydrophobic substrate.


They provide a firm conceptual framework for tailoring the properties of new materials, including finding super-repellant substrates, such as expelling water from windscreens. Their findings are published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

Comments