International Edu News: Meet Gitanjali Rao, TIME's First-Ever Kid of The Year 2020  |  Cover Story: Lead us to the Right Test  |  Parent Interventions: Diagnosis and management of food allergies in children  |  Science Innovations: How Emotions Are Generated in Our Brain  |  Science Innovations: Primate Eye Functions Like a Digital Camera  |  Best Practices: IIT, NITs, Engineering Colleges to Adopt National Highway on Voluntary Basis  |  National Edu News: New Campus of National Institute of Naturopathy in Pune to be named 'Nisarg Gram  |  Best Practices: The Gender Voice Lab  |  International Edu News: Macquarie Launches MindSpot Academy for Digital Mental Health Services  |  Guest Column: Edtech Drives Innovation in School Education  |  Leadership Instincts: Peking University co-initiates Observatory of Higher Education Transformations   |  Technology Inceptions: New tool to check for data leakage from AI systems  |  Education Information: New partnership to create apps to learn social and emotional intelligence  |  Leadership Instincts: Peter Russell to lead SIGS Institute of Future Human Habitats  |  Policy Indications: A task force to impart technical education in Mother Tongue  |  
November 18, 2020 Wednesday 04:40:35 PM IST

New green materials could power smart devices using ambient light

International Edu News

Now, researchers from the University of Cambridge, Imperial College London and Soochow University in China have discovered that new green materials currently being developed for next-generation solar panels could be useful for indoor light harvesting. They report their findings in Advanced Energy Materials.

The team investigated perovskite-inspired materials, which were created to circumvent problems with materials called perovskites, which were developed for next-generation solar cells. Although perovskites are cheaper to make than traditional silicon-based solar panels and deliver similar efficiency, perovskites contain toxic lead substances. This drove the development of perovskite-inspired materials, which are instead based on safer elements like bismuth and antimony.

Despite being more environmentally friendly, these perovskite-inspired materials are not as efficient at absorbing sunlight. However, the team found that the materials are much more effective at absorbing indoor light, with efficiencies that are promising for commercial applications. Crucially, the researchers demonstrated that the power provided by these materials under indoor illumination is already sufficient to operate electronic circuits.

In addition to their eco-friendly nature, these materials could potentially be processed onto unconventional substrates such as plastics and fabric, which are incompatible with conventional technologies. Therefore, lead-free perovskite-inspired materials could soon enable battery-free devices for wearables, healthcare monitoring, smart homes, and smart cities.

(Content Courtesy: https://www.cam.ac.uk/research/news/new-green-materials-could-power-smart-devices-using-ambient-light)

Comments