Life Inspirations: Sushila Sable-From Waste Picker to Ambassador of Climate Change  |  Science Innovations: Killing drug-resistant bacteria  |  Technology Inceptions: Canon EOS 200D II DSLR With Dual Pixel AF  |  Teacher Insights: Exercise activates memory neural networks   |  Management lessons: BPCL Allows Women Chemical Engineers in Night Shift  |  Health Monitor: Increase in Global Alcoholism Raises Global Disease Burden  |  Parent Interventions: Obesity in Pre-Pregnancy Stage Can Affect Quality of Breast Milk  |  Higher Studies: Indian Institute of Space Science and Technology UG Admissions  |  Technology Inceptions: Now Drones to Deliver Food   |  Technology Inceptions: India to Establish One lakh Digital Villages: Ravi Shankar Prasad  |  Best Practices: FSSAI to Impose Curbs on Promoting Unhealthy Products in School Premises  |  Management lessons: E-Services Most Important in Design of Smart Tourism Organisation  |  Rajagiri Round Table: 'Draft New Educational Policy Comprehensive, Hurdles Likely in Implementation'  |  International Edu News: Estonian schools promote English  |  Technology Inceptions: Microsoft AI Helps Leading Naukrigulf.com Attract More Jobseekers, Employers  |  
  • Pallikkutam Magazine
  • Companion Magazine
  • Mentor
  • Smart Board
  • Pallikkutam Publications

November 16, 2017 Thursday 03:30:32 PM IST

NASA tool predicts which cities face floods

Science Innovations

New York: NASA scientists have developed a tool to forecast which cities are vulnerbale to flooding due to melting of ice in a warming climate. It looks at the Earth's spin and gravitational effects to predict how water will be "redistributed" globally, BBC reported.

"This provides, for each city, a picture of which glaciers, ice sheets, (and) ice caps are of specific importance," the researchers were quoted as saying. The research, detailed in the journal Science Advances, could provide scientists a way to determine which ice sheets they should be "most worried about".

The researchers explained that as land ice is lost to the oceans, both the Earth's gravitational and rotational potentials are perturbed, resulting in strong spatial patterns in sea-level rise (SLR). The pattern of sea-level change has been termed sea-level fingerprints. 

"We lack robust forecasting models for future ice changes, which diminishes our ability to use these fingerprints to accurately predict local sea-level (LSL) changes," the researchers said. So they set out to determine the exact gradient of sea-level fingerprints with respect to local variations in the ice thickness of all of the world's ice drainage systems. 


"By exhaustively mapping these fingerprint gradients, we form a new diagnosis tool, henceforth referred to as gradient fingerprint mapping (GFM), that readily allows for improved assessments of future coastal inundation or emergence," the study said. 

The researchers demonstrated that for Antarctica and Greenland, changes in the predictions of inundation at major port cities depend on the location of the drainage system. 

For example, in London, local sea-level changes is significantly affected by changes on the western part of the Greenland ice sheet, whereas in New York, such changes are greatly sensitive to changes in the northeastern portions of the ice sheet, the tool showed.


Comments