Guest Column: The Eight Billion Opportunity!  |  Finance: Covidonomics   |  Parent Interventions: Enrichment programmes help children build knowledge  |  Parent Interventions: Half of moms-to-be at risk of preeclampsia are missing out on preventive aspirin  |  Parent Interventions: First month of data shows children at low risk of COVID-19 infection  |  Teacher Insights: First-generation learners being left behind in global education  |  Teacher Insights: Deep learning: A new engine for ecological resource research  |  Parent Interventions: Study compares the health of Irish children to those across Europe and Canada  |  Policy Indications: MHRD ensures safe shifting of stranded students of Jawahar Navodaya Vidyalayas  |  National Edu News: RNA extraction kit Agappe Chitra Magna launched commercially  |  National Edu News: Certifying Quantum Entanglement: A step towards Quantum Security  |  Leadership Instincts: IIT Guwahati discovers new ways to prevent memory loss due to Alzheimer  |  Teacher Insights: 82 UG and 42 PG Non-Engineering MOOCs to be offered on SWAYAM  |  International Edu News: Handwashing 6-10 times a day linked to lower infection risk  |  Leadership Instincts: Bristol’s photon discovery, a major step toward large-scale quantum technologies  |  
October 04, 2018 Thursday 03:59:54 PM IST

Multiple-choice tests enhance learning

Teacher Insights

Multiple-choice tests are both tools for assessment and they enhance learning. Cognitive psychologists of Washington University, U.S.A. have recently made detailed study on improving the efficacy of multiple-choice tests, whose results are published in the Journal of Applied Research in Memory and Cognition.

The study provides six research-based recommendations for crafting more effective multiple choice questions:

  • Create questions with simple formats. Complex formats encourage guessing and less on recalling correct information.
  • Create questions that engage "real world" cognitive processes. Questions that require higher-order thinking will enhance learning and improve future performance.
  • Avoid using "none of the above" as answer choice. When "none-of-the-above" is correct, students may not need to retrieve correct information to answer the question and they are exposed a lot of incorrect information.
  • Avoid using“all of the above”as answer choice. Using "all of the above" exposes students to a lot of correct information, but answers may be more obvious, robbing students of potential learning that comes from recall processing.
  • Use three plausible response options. Question difficulty increases with each answer option offered. Questions that offer too many plausible answers can have a negative effect on both learning and assessment.
  • Make the test challenging, but not too difficult. Create tests that are hard enough to reveal how well students know the material, but easy enough that a majority (80 percent) get a passing grade. Challenge students, but allow them to succeed.

Feedback enables test-takers to correct errors and avoid internalizing incorrect information. It also strengthens learning around correct answers that were low-confidence guesses at test time.

To maximize both effectiveness and efficiency, it is also best to keep the process of answering multiple-choice items simple -- added complexity often has a negative effect on both learning and assessment, suggests the study.


 

Comments