Teacher Insights: Access to SWAYAM and other digital initiatives goes up  |  Policy Indications: Major relief measures for power sector  |  Education Information: Kerala Government postpones KEAM Entrance Exam 2020  |  Policy Indications: COVID-19: UNICEF continues to ship vital supplies to affected countries   |  International Edu News: WHO Director-General calls on G20 to Fight, Unite, and Ignite against COVID-19  |  Education Information: WHO WhatsApp health alert launches in Arabic, French and Spanish  |  National Edu News: SJVN provides Rs 1 Cr for buying ventilators  |  Science Innovations: DST launches nationwide exercise to map & boost Covid19 solutions   |  National Edu News: Officers and staff of MNRE working from Home through e-office platform  |  National Edu News: Doordarshan to bring back famed Ramayan on Doordarshan National  |  Best Practices: Post Offices provide basic postal and financial services during COVID-19 lockdown  |  Leadership Instincts: Covid-19: Minister directs Kendriya Vidyalaya Sangathan to provide buildings   |  Education Information: National Testing Agency Postpones NEET UG May-2020  |  Leadership Instincts: Fight Corona IDEAthon   |  International Edu News: UK PM Boris Johnson tests positive for coronavirus  |  
February 26, 2020 Wednesday 04:53:11 PM IST

MU researcher examines impact of digital learning on student creativity

Policy Indications

Researchers at the University of Missouri have found that activity-based learning, rather than lecture-based, enhances student creativity and learning by allowing students to use technology to develop their own original ideas.

Isa Jahnke, associate professor in the MU College of Education's School of Information Science and Learning Technologies, collaborated with former doctoral student Julia Liebscher to study how higher education professors in Europe use mobile technology in their classes. She found that student creativity was most enhanced by professors who allowed their students to use technology in a team setting to come up with a novel product or idea.

For example, one group of students in a history class developed an app that virtually teaches users about the history surrounding the Berlin Wall. Rather than simply lecturing the material to the students, Jahnke found that allowing them to use technology in a collaborative way enhanced the students' creativity and understanding of the content.

"This research is useful for professors to rethink how they design their existing courses," Jahnke said. "We need to shift away from purely lecture-based learning where students are just consumers of information toward a more meaningful learning approach with technology where students are able to come up with creative and novel solutions in a team setting."


Jahnke added that there are resources at MU, such as the Teaching For Learning Center, to help professors rethink their course designs amidst the ever-changing educational landscape.

"If we have universities that are producing more creative-thinking students, then we have more people who can help come up with solutions for all of society's grand challenges," Jahnke said. "Creativity will lead to better innovators, entrepreneurs and business owners, but first we need to ask ourselves as educators if we are using technology to put our students in positions to be creative in the first place."


(Content Courtesy: https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2020-02/uom-tih022420.php)


Comments