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August 03, 2020 Monday 10:05:49 PM IST

Motion Capture Technology to Predict Onset of Arthritis

Health Monitor

Motion capture technology may be good at distinguishing between healthy hand movements and those with osteoarthritis (OA). This method could potentially detect arthritis earlier and prevent the loss of thumb function according to Dr Tamara Bush and research scholar Amber Vocelle of Michigan State University.
Our work suggests that three-dimensional motion tasks may be able to identify OA-associated motion deficits earlier than the two-dimensional motion tasks typically used in a clinical setting,” said Amber Vocelle, co-author on the research and a DO/PhD student in the College of Osteopathic Medicine. “By identifying the disease earlier, we can treat OA earlier in the disease process.”
According to Vocelle, therapists and clinicians traditionally use goniometers, simple two-dimensional measurement tools, along with basic movements to screen for reduced hand function due to OA. But the results can vary depending on who’s doing the measuring, making it hard to track reliably over time.

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