Science Innovations: New process to help dispose liquid nuclear waste safely   |  Science Innovations: New prospects of bio-inspired materials for energy & biotechnology sector  |  National Edu News: CSIR-CMERI develops Sustainable Municipal Solid Waste Processing Facility  |  Technology Inceptions: Casio G-Squad GBD-H1000  |  Technology Inceptions: JBL Earbuds C100TWS  |  National Edu News: Countrywide S&T infrastructure facilities to be accessible to industry & startup  |  Education Information: A web clinic series to strengthen S&T capacity of NGOs & Communities  |  Life Inspirations: Wizard with a Sense of Society  |  National Edu News: India designated Vice-Chair of OECD Working Group on GLP  |  Education Information: New International Faculty Visitors’ Accommodation at IIT Kharagpur  |  Policy Indications: Union Education Minister virtually launches 'KAPILA'  |  Education Information: Education Minister addresses the students of ASEAN PhD Fellowship Programme  |  Education Information: New Innovation & Incubation Center and Sports Complex at IIT Jodhpur   |  Policy Indications: "Follow the Social Vaccine”: Dr. Harsh Vardhan  |  Guest Column: Chromosome of a Successful Edu-Startup  |  
June 26, 2019 Wednesday 10:59:26 AM IST

More screen time, less attention

Parent Interventions

Screen time above a two-hour threshold among pre-schoolers is associated with an increased risk of clinically relevant externalizing problems such as inattention, and significantly more behaviour problems at five years of age, according to a study published in the open-access journal PLOS ONE of the University of Alberta.

Increased screen time in children has been associated with unhealthy dietary patterns, poor sleep quality, cardiovascular disease, and obesity. There has been a significant increase in screen options in recent years, from device choices to streaming content. Children with more than two hours of screen time per day had a 7.7-fold increased risk of meeting criteria for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.  The findings indicate that pre-school may be a critical period for educating parents and families about limiting screen time and encouraging physical activity. Interestingly, the more time children spent doing organized sports, the less likely they were to exhibit behavioural problems. Early childhood education must focus on learning through ‘power of play’, according to the study.


Comments