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February 17, 2020 Monday 09:10:04 AM IST

Missing proteins in neurological disorders in children

Health Monitor

When there is a lack of a key protein during the prenatal and early childhood development, generation of new cells get affected and lead to a long -term cognitive decline. It may also lead to movement behaviors that mirror autism spectrum disorder. Scientists at Rutgers-Newark University are engaged in the study of p75NTR protein that is required to regulate cell division. The absence of this protein may have an impact on brain development functioning and survival. In the Rutgers-Newark study, researchers trained mice – with and without the p75NTR protein – to associate a quick puff of air with a blinking light. Mice with the protein learned to blink and shut their eyes when they saw the light while mice without the protein did not. Other scientific studies have found this same learning deficit in mice with mutations in genes that are associated with autism.

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