Teacher Insights: Access to SWAYAM and other digital initiatives goes up  |  Policy Indications: Major relief measures for power sector  |  Education Information: Kerala Government postpones KEAM Entrance Exam 2020  |  Policy Indications: COVID-19: UNICEF continues to ship vital supplies to affected countries   |  International Edu News: WHO Director-General calls on G20 to Fight, Unite, and Ignite against COVID-19  |  Education Information: WHO WhatsApp health alert launches in Arabic, French and Spanish  |  National Edu News: SJVN provides Rs 1 Cr for buying ventilators  |  Science Innovations: DST launches nationwide exercise to map & boost Covid19 solutions   |  National Edu News: Officers and staff of MNRE working from Home through e-office platform  |  National Edu News: Doordarshan to bring back famed Ramayan on Doordarshan National  |  Best Practices: Post Offices provide basic postal and financial services during COVID-19 lockdown  |  Leadership Instincts: Covid-19: Minister directs Kendriya Vidyalaya Sangathan to provide buildings   |  Education Information: National Testing Agency Postpones NEET UG May-2020  |  Leadership Instincts: Fight Corona IDEAthon   |  International Edu News: UK PM Boris Johnson tests positive for coronavirus  |  
February 17, 2020 Monday 09:10:04 AM IST

Missing proteins in neurological disorders in children

Health Monitor

When there is a lack of a key protein during the prenatal and early childhood development, generation of new cells get affected and lead to a long -term cognitive decline. It may also lead to movement behaviors that mirror autism spectrum disorder. Scientists at Rutgers-Newark University are engaged in the study of p75NTR protein that is required to regulate cell division. The absence of this protein may have an impact on brain development functioning and survival. In the Rutgers-Newark study, researchers trained mice – with and without the p75NTR protein – to associate a quick puff of air with a blinking light. Mice with the protein learned to blink and shut their eyes when they saw the light while mice without the protein did not. Other scientific studies have found this same learning deficit in mice with mutations in genes that are associated with autism.

Comments